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ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 229-236

Oral hygiene status, self-reported oral malodor, oral hygiene practices, and oral health knowledge: A cross-sectional study in a group of Muslim Thai pregnant women


1 Department of Conservative Dentistry; Common Oral Diseases and Epidemiology Research Center, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Thailand
2 Department of Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Supawadee Naorungroj
Department of Conservative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince of Songkla University, 15 Kanjanavanich Road, Hat Yai, Songkhla
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jioh.jioh_184_18

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Objective: The aim of this study is to determine oral hygiene status, self-reported oral malodor, oral hygiene practices, oral health knowledge, and the differences across educational levels in a group of Muslim Thai pregnant women. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Yaring, Pattani, Thailand. A total of 88 pregnant women were invited to participate in this study. The enrolled patients answered a self-administered questionnaire comprising sociodemographic data, self-perceived oral malodor, oral hygiene practices, as well as their knowledge about the causes and effects of gingivitis during the prenatal period. Gingival health, plaque deposit, and tongue coating were assessed using the modified gingival index (MGI), the plaque index (PI), and the Winkel index (WTCI), respectively. The associations of educational levels with clinical measures and questionnaire responses were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: The pregnant women had moderate levels of gingival inflammation (MGI = 1.36 ± 0.40), visible plaque deposit (PI = 1.43 ± 0.47), and thinly dispersed tongue coating (WTCI = 5.40 ± 2.82). MGI significantly decreased as educational levels increased (P = 0.041). Although 90% of the participants had knowledge pertaining to good oral hygiene habits, a high number of participants reported a short brushing time (77%), irregular tooth brushing after meals (66%), irregular tongue cleaning (46%), and a bad breath experience (71%). Furthermore, a significant number of pregnant women lacked knowledge of or misunderstood oral-systemic health relationships. Oral hygiene practices and oral health knowledge were not significantly different across educational levels. Conclusion: The majority of Muslim Thai pregnant women had fair oral hygiene, improper self-oral hygiene care, and inadequate knowledge of the importance of oral-systemic health relationships.


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